MLA style citation

Overview

(See below for specifics on works cited entries and on how to cite in your essay itself.)

Note: this site uses pop-up windows and java script.  If you have pop-up blockers, you'll have to turn them off to access all the features of this site.

"When do I cite a source?"
Whenever you include a word, phrase, or idea from a source, it needs to be cited.  That source can include a web page, classroom lecture, an interview with your Uncle Pete, a quote or summary from a book, magazine, etc.  And note the "a" word: singular.  Even a single word from someone else, when included in your own essay, needs to be set off with quotation marks and then cited.

"When do I use MLA?"
In general, classes in the Humanities (English, History, Art) use MLA style citation.  You should always check with your professor and ask which style they would prefer for a particular assignment.

"How do I cite using MLA?"
The number two is important to remember when using MLA citation because it consists of two parts: an in-text citation (which includes the author and usually the page number) and a works cited entry (included on separate "Works Cited" page at end of essay), as shown in the examples below:

1) Sample In-Text Citation (the part that goes in your essay)

Work for a living? Feeling a bit poor lately? The link between the two is not difficult to explain when you examine recent pay raises. In 1997, the average worker received a raise of 3 percent. Her CEO? Many earned a 21 percent raise (Cooper 339).

Note that the author's name and page number is enclosed in parenthesis (no p. or page is needed) and that the period goes to the right of the parenthesis.

2) Sample Works Cited Entry (the part that goes on a "Works Cited" separate page at the end) for in-text citation above:

Cooper, Mary H. "Income Inequality." CQ Researcher 17 April 1997: 337-360.

Together, these two parts let the reader know who wrote your article, where they can find it, and approximately how long the article is.

This two part citation method works like a code. In general, the reader looks for the author’s name and page number in the in-text citation (or the first word of the title if there is no author), and then goes to the works cited entry for additional information. Your job is to supply the correct parts of the code in the correct order.

You have to be sure that the name/word you include in your in-text citation will match the first word of one of your works cited entries. Thus, the word “Cooper” from the in-text example above (in the parenthesis) matches the word “Cooper” in the sample works cited entry.

Readers would see the citation (Cooper 339) and instantly know that the information before the citation is from a writer named “Cooper.” If they wanted to check your source, they would turn to the Works Cited page and scan the first word of the alphabetically arranged list of Works Cited entries until the word “Cooper” appeared.

The Specifics
Back to Top
Below you'll find sample works cited entries and in text citations for a variety of commonly used sources from OCC's library.

First determine what kind of source you're taking information from -- an anthology? online database? -- then click on the link for a sample works cited entry and in-text citation.

Print

Online

Other

  • Book
  • Book with Two Authors
  • Anthology Collections of essays or fiction in one book, such as  Sources of the Western Tradition, Norton Anthology, Opposing Viewpoints, Twentieth Century Literary Criticism, etc.

Online Databases


Remember that these entries must be alphabetized on a "Works Cited" page.  See Formatting Essays for examples.

Note: this page uses pop-up windows and java script.  If you have pop-up blockers, you'll have to turn them off to access all features of this site.

For more complete information on these and other citation methods, go to Purdue's Online Writing lab.


Print Sources

Article from an Anthology (see below for several examples)
Works Cited Entry Rereading America

Moore, Michael. “Idiot Nation.” Rereading America. Eds. Gary Colombo,

Robert Cullen, and Bonnie Lisle. Boston: St. Martin's, 2004.

153-170. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citations for entry above:
Direct quote:
Sarcasm can be used effectively to make an argument. When Michael Moore writes “Who cares if 70 percent of those who graduate from America's colleges are not required to learn a foreign language? Isn't the rest of the world speaking English now?” (157), he humorously exposes the ignorance of our views both of other countries and our education system.

Direct Quote of more than four lines on your page:

Michael Moore laments the misguided priorities of our elected officials when it comes to education. He notes that

the political leaders – and the people who vote for them – have decided it's a bigger priority to build another bomber than to educate our children. They would rather hold hearings about the depravity of a television show called Jackass than about their own depravity in neglecting our schools [ . . . ] and maintaining our title as Dumbest Country on Earth. (156)

This misguided use of money and intellect is part of the problem with the education system in this country.

Note ellipsis for excluded words in square brackets.  Three dots are used because the words removed are within a sentence.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

History textbook (Anthology)
Works Cited Entry Sources of the Western Tradition
Sallust. "Moral Deterioration." Sources of the Western Tradition.

Eds. Marvin Perry, Joseph R. Peden, and Theodore H. Von Laue. 

Boston:
 Houghton Mifflin Company, 2003. 123-125. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above:
One connection between the decline of the American Empire and the decline of the Roman Empire is corrupting influence of money.  The Roman writer Sallust traced the cause of the moral decay to a "Growing love of money, and the lust for power which followed it [. . . .] Ambition tempted many to be false, to have one thought hidden in their hearts, another ready on their tongues, to become a man's friend or enemy not because they judged him worthy or unworthy but because they thought it would pay them, and to put on the semblance of virtues that they had not" (124).  We see this in too many of our elected officials and citizens, as they profess their "faith" and "piety," yet arrange for special deals that line their pockets with greenbacks while ignoring the public good.

Note ellipsis for excluded words in square brackets.  Four dots are used because a period was included in the words removed.

Literature textbook (Anthology)
 Works Cited Entry The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces (Follow this format for other literature anthologies)
Aristophanes. Lysistrata The Norton Anthology of World Masterpieces

Eds. Sarah Lawall et al. 2 vols. New York: Norton, 1999.

647-726. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entries above:
Direct quote from play included in essay
The colloquial translation of Lysistrata by Douglass Parker is indicated by such lines as “Relax, honey” (650). 

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Twentieth Century (Or contemporary) Literary Criticism (Anthology)
 Works Cited Entry

Boxer, David and Cassandra Phillips. From "’Will You Please Be Quiet,

Please?’: Voyeurism, Dissociation, and the Art of Raymond Carver."

Iowa Review 10 (1979): 75-90. Rprt. In “Raymond Carver.”

Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Sharon R. Gunton and Jean C.

Stue. Vol. 22. Detroit: Gale Research, 1982. 98-101. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entries above:
Direct quote
The critics David Boxer and Cassandra Phillips also note Carver’s seeming lack of style. They write that "[. . .] what seems to be casual talk, virtually empty of communication, is really very deliberately and finely wrought" (99). This emphasis on the craft of his fiction – it is “deliberately and finely wrought” – underscores the nature of Carver’s oxymoronic talent: he made conversation seem so natural that it seems to merely record what is being said.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Anthology Series
(Taking Sides, Opposing Viewpoints, etc.)
Works Cited Entry Opposing Viewpoints:
Marsh, Daniel L. "America's Values Are Found in Its Documents." American

Values: Opposing Viewpoints. Ed. David L. Bender. San Diego:

Greenhaven Press, 1989. 17-25. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.


In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote: From Opposing Viewpoints
For our political system to function, our electorate needs a basic understanding of the underpinnings of democracy. Daniel L. Marsh, former president of Boston College, argues that Americans "must have an intelligent comprehension of the ideas and ideals that underlie our [. . .] democracy" (18). His emphasis on "intelligent comprehension" supports the view that the dreaded civics class needs to be revitalized.

Note ellipsis for excluded words in square brackets.  Three dots are used because the words removed are within a sentence.

MATERIAL BY EDITOR IN AN ANTHOLOGY
Works Cited Entry:
Cooper, Charles and Susan Peck MacDonald, eds. Writing the World.

Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Direct Quote
To fully engage in American culture, Charles Cooper and Susan Peck MacDonald  write, "means entering the conversation finding out what others think, figuring out what you think, and gaining a deeper understanding of the world you live in" (1).

Book
Works Cited Entry
Hirsch, E. D. Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know.

New York: Vintage Books, 1987. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Direct Quote
E. D. Hirsch warns that focusing only on a particular trade or field can ultimately limit a person's career choices: "Narrow vocational training in one state of a technology will not enable a person to read manuals that explain new developments in the same technology.  In modern life we need general knowledge that enables us to deal with new ideas, events, and challenges" (11).  Embracing all the knowledge that a culture offers, including literature, music, art, mathematics, history, and the sciences, amounts to job security, because it gives students the skills to face any intellectual -- or employment --  challenge. 

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Magazine (Print)
Works Cited Entry
Levinson, Marc and Rich Thomas. "One Tax Fits All." Newsweek 15 January

1996: 36. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Summary:
A flat tax rate sounds like a good idea, but as Marc Levinson and Rich Thomas argue, it would amount to higher taxes for the working class, and no taxes at all for the leisure class -- those people who live off money handed down to them (36).

Newspaper (Print)
Works Cited Entry:
James, Caryn. "Dysfunction Wears Out Its Welcome." New York Times 3

December 1995: H1+. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

If source was in a numbered section, use the following format which adds the word "sec."
James, Caryn. "Dysfunction Wears Out Its Welcome." New York Times 3

December 1995, sec. 3:1+. Print.

In-text citation for entry above
Partial direct quote – ellipsis dots rule is three if within sentence, four if subtracted phrase include a period.  Use brackets to separate your ellipsis from the quote
After analyzing current sitcoms, Caryn James discovers that "[. . .] they have come to resemble melodrama and soap opera more than they reflect comic versions of real life" (1).

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Encyclopedia (note: usually only signed articles are acceptable for academic essays)
Works Cited Entry:

Frueh, Christopher B. "Posttraumatic Stress Disorder."  Encyclopedia of

Psychology. Ed. E. Kazdin. 6 vols. New York: Oxford University Press,

2000.  249-251. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above:
Psychologists note that one of the main features of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder is that the "event is persistently reexperienced" (249).

Book with Two or More Authors
Works Cited Entry:
Phelps, Timothy and Helen Winternitz. Capital Games. New York: Harper

Perennial, 1993. Print.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Direct quote:
In their examination of the Anita Hill and Clarence Thomas controversy, Timothy Phelps and Helen Winternitz come to the ominous conclusion that either "a Supreme Court justice had committed perjury to get himself on the bench or Hill and his opponents had engaged in an unprecedented criminal conspiracy in an attempt to defeat him" (441). From the evidence in their book, it seems that someone has committed perjury.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top


Online Sources

College Databases

Magazine (EBSCOHost)
First, determine if your source is a scholarly journal (published quarterly -- it will say Fall, or Winter, and in most cases the pages will continue from issue to the next) or monthly/weekly magazine -- both are formatted differently.

Magazine: Scholarly Journal (published quarterly)
Works Cited Entry:
Mitchell, Domhnall. “The Grammar of Ornament: Emily Dickinson's

Manuscripts and Their Meanings.” Nineteenth-Century Literature 55.2

(2001): 179-204. Academic Search Premier. Web. 23 August 2001.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above:
Direct quote:
Domhnall Mitchell notes that “some critics allege that to read Dickinson in any standard typographic edition is effectively to read her in translation.” This suggests that the usual method of reading a poem in a textbook doesn't always reveal a writer's intention.
Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Magazine: (published monthly/weekly)
Works Cited Entry:
Levinson, Marc and Rich Thomas. "One Tax Fits All." Newsweek 15 January

1996: 36. Academic Search Premier. Web. 3 December 2000.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.


In-text citation for entry above
:
Summary:
A flat tax rate sounds like a good idea, but as Marc Levinson and Rich Thomas argue, it would amount to higher taxes for the working class, and no taxes at all for the leisure class -- those people who live off money handed down to them.
Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Lexis-Nexis
Works Cited Entry:

James, Caryn. "Dysfunction Wears Out Its Welcome." New York Times

3 December 1995: H1+. Lexis Nexis. Web. 9 August 2004.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote:
After analyzing sitcoms from the early 90s, Caryn James discovers that "they have come to resemble melodrama and soap opera more than they reflect comic versions of real life." James believes that sitcoms are supposed to reflect "real life" and thus are no longer relevant.
Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Proquest (New York Times)
Works Cited Entry:
James, Caryn. "Dysfunction Wears Out Its Welcome." New York Times

3 December 1995: H1+. Proquest. Web. 9 August 2004.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote:
After analyzing sitcoms from the early 90s, Caryn James discovers that "they have come to resemble melodrama and soap opera more than they reflect comic versions of real life." James believes that sitcoms are supposed to reflect "real life" and thus are no longer relevant.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

SIRS
Works Cited Entry:

Elson, John. "The Test That Everyone Fears." Time 12 Nov. 1995:

93-94. SIRS. Web. 3 December 2000.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote (remember that you do not have to cite the entire sentence if it is not needed) and paraphrase:
Testing by University of Georgia psychologist Dr. Stuart Katz showed that university students "correctly answered [. . .] 38% of the multiple choice comprehension questions without even reading the test selections" (qtd. in Elson). To answer a third of the questions through sheer luck illustrates the need to eliminate multiple choice evaluation.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Opposing Viewpoints

Bennet, William. “America Faces a Moral Crisis.” Opposing Viewpoints:

American Values. Ed. Jennifer Hurley. 2000. Opposing Viewpoints

Resources Center. Web. 8 March 2004.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.


In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote
The professed gambler William Bennet – he of Book of Virtues infamy – illustrates this conservative hypocrisy. While he spends millions in gambling, Bennet argues that it is not those of moral rectitude, like himself, that are despoiling his precious America, but others who suffer from “spiritual acedia.” But I have a question for Mr. Bennet: where in the bible does it say “Thou shalt lose millions at the green velvet tables of Las Vegas and Atlantic City”? He is a walking example of the difficulties of accusing others of leading an immoral life: and given his knowledge of the bible, he should know the danger of casting the first stone.
Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Gale Literature Resource
Works Cited Entry: (Scholarly Journal)

Kaplan, Steven. “The Undying Certainty of the Narrator in Tim O’Brien’s

The Things they Carried.” Critique 35.4 (1993): 43-52. Literature

Resource Center. Web. 10 August 2005.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Partial direct quote

Another connection between the Vietnam War and current events is government lies. As Steven Kaplan notes “Before the United States became militarily involved in defending the sovereignty of South Vietnam, it had to, as one historian recently put it, "invent" [. . .] the political issues at stake there.” Similarly, after weapons of mass destruction were not found in Iraq, our current administration had to “invent” a new rationale for attacking Iraq. And the rationale de jour, promoting democracy to protect American interests, is eerily similar to the failed objective in Southeast Asia.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

JSTOR
Works Cited Entry: (Scholarly Journal)

Goodman, Russell B. “East-West Philosophy in Nineteenth-Century America:

Emerson and Hinduism.” Journal of the History of Ideas 51.4 (1993):

625-645. JSTOR. Web. 28 August 2009.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Partial direct quote

While there are differences between Asian philosophies and Transcendentalism, Russell B. Goodman notes "that Emerson's philosophy, from his college days onward, grew up together with his knowledge of and interest in Hindu philosophical writing" (625 emphasis in original).

Note: Although this is an online source, page numbers are cited because they are included in the document itself.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Oxford English Dictionary (OED)
Works Cited Entry

"Redemption." Oxford English Dictionary Online. Oxford University Press.

n.d. Web. 28 August 2009.

In-text citation for entry above
Partial direct quote

The religious connotations of Rowlandson's use of "redemption" are clear when the definition -- "Deliverance from sin and its consequences by the atonement of Jesus Christ" -- is understood ("Redemption")

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Oxford Reference Collection
Works Cited Entry

"Modernism." The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. Ed. Chris Baldick.

Oxford University Press, 2008. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford

University Press. Web. 6 March 2009.

In-text citation for entry above
Partial direct quote

Modernism's attempt to shock and disorient readers is connected to their desire to reject "bourgeois values" ("Modernism").

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Facts on File
Works Cited Entry

Jaycox, Faith. "Settlement Spreads in New England, the Chesapeake,

and the Middle Atlantic: 1630–1642." The Colonial Era, An Eyewitness

History. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2002. American History

Online. Facts On File. Web. 28 August 2009.

In-text citation for entry above
Partial direct quote

The combination of economics and religion in early Puritan literature is based on their involvement in the colonial enterprise. As the historian Faith Jaycox points out, "All investors were also colonists. In effect, the company, or corporation (as it was called), and the colony were one and the same."

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Article from CQ Researcher: MAGAZINE (PDF)
Works Cited Entry:

Cooper, Mary H. "Income Inequality." CQ Researcher. The CQ Researcher Online.  

16 March 1997: 337-360. Web. 28 August 2009.  

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Summarized source:
Work for a living? Feeling a bit poor lately? The link between the two is not difficult to explain when you examine recent pay raises. In 1997, the average worker received a raise of 3 percent. Her CEO? Many earned a 21 percent raise (Cooper 339). Feeling a bit angry now? 
Note: Although this is an online source, page numbers are cited because they are included in the PDF file.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Article from CQ Researcher: Online
Works Cited Entry:

Cooper, Mary H. "Income Inequality." CQ Researcher. The CQ Researcher Online.  

16 March 1997. Web. 28 August 2009.  

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Summarized source:
Work for a living? Feeling a bit poor lately? The link between the two is not difficult to explain when you examine recent pay raises. In 1997, the average worker received a raise of 3 percent. Her CEO? Many earned a 21 percent raise (Cooper). Feeling a bit angry now? 
Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top


General Internet Sources

Internet site
Works Cited Entry:

Harlow, Harry. "The Nature of Love." Classics in the History of Psychology.

York University. n.d. Web. 27 March 2004.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Summary
At least one study suggests that tactical stimulation is just as important as food for nurture (Harlow).
Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Magazine/Newspaper site
Works Cited Entry:

Lopez, Kathryn Jean.  "Not Your Father's Labor Union." National Review

Online. National Review. 5 August 2004. Web. 8 August 2009.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.


In-text citation for entry above
:
Direct Quote
Kathyrn Jean Lopez, in an interview with Linda Chavez, at the end of her union bashing screed, states "I know unions are corrupt." What's missing in this essay on the influence of union money in political campaigns is any mention of corporate influence on the political process.  In the world that Lopez and Chavez inhabit, big, bad unions are scourges out of touch with mainstream America.  But if it wasn't for labor unions, and the combined money they can bring to the political arena, would any politicians pay (no pun intended) attention to labor concerns -- in other words, would they even listen to workers?  That's a question that Lopez and her fellow writers at The National Review are not prepared to answer -- though they're more than ready to scare workers away from unions.
Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Course Site
Works Cited Entry

Bordelon, David. "Introduction." Assignments. The Short Story. Ocean County

College. 2007. Web. 31 August 2009.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above:
Direct quote
The brilliant literary scholar David Bordelon argues that literature is the stuff of life:

After all, literature in general . . . is about love lost or gained, the curious relationship between language and reality, a father shooting his son's murderer, a man learning to "see" with the help of a blind man; in short, it is about the flotsam and jetsam, vagaries and varieties of daily life. It seems only fair to hold reality up to fiction and see how it compares. (The Short)

This view of literature means that instead of being boring words on a page, literature pulses with the blood of life: if you’re splattered with red droplets, you know you’ve read properly.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Email
Works Cited Entry

Froriep, Kathleen."Re: Reading Comprehension Strategies." Message to

David Bordelon. 22 June 2005. Email.

In-text citation for entry above:
Summary

An important part of reading involves prereading, or quickly reviewing a text (Froriep).

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top


Other

Interview
Works Cited Entry:
Melville, Herman. Personal Interview. 20 May 1855.

In-text citation for entry above:
Direct Quote:
I remember when Herman Melville told me “better watch out for those leviathans.”

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Lecture
Works Cited Entry: (Note: if lecture has a title, include it in quotation marks instead of using Classroom Lecture)

Hurrey, Ina. Classroom Lecture. Ocean County College. Toms River,

New Jersey, 10 March 2001.

In-text citation for entry above:
Summary
Dr. Ina Hurrey always rushed out of class.

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Television
Works Cited Entry:
NBC Nightly News. National Broadcasting Company. WNBC, New York. 14 April 1990. Television.
 
In-text citation for entry above
Summary
A report first aired on NBC, exposed the doctoring of food by Shop-Wrong supermarkets(NBC).

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Television - Online
Works Cited Entry:

"August is Deadliest Month U.S. Military in Afghanistan." CNN.com.

Cable News Network. 28 August 2009. Web. 30 August 2009.


In-text citation for entry above
Summary
A CNN report suggests that additional security for the "presidential and provincial elections" contributed to the increase in American casualties in August 2009 ("August").

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

TV Transcript
Works Cited Entry:

"August is Deadliest Month U.S. Military in Afghanistan." CNN.com.

Cable News Network. 28 August 2009. Web. 30 August 2009.

Transcript.


In-text citation for entry above
Summary
A CNN report suggests that additional security for the "presidential and provincial elections" contributed to the increase in American casualties in August 2009 ("August").

Radio Transcript
“Letters Sent to President Dwight D. Eisenhower on the Brown

vs. Board of Education Decision.” All Things Considered.

National Public Radio. 17 May 2004. Web. 18 August 2008.

Transcript.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Direct Quote
The racial hypocrisy of 1950s America is readily seen in a letter by Ann Grinham to President Eisenhower protesting the Brown v. Board of Education decision. She writes “Of course we believe in equal rights. Educate the Negroes, give them advantages, but by all means, keep them to themselves” (qtd. in “Letters”). Her comments, of course, raise an obvious question: how does being kept to yourself reconcile with equal rights?

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top

Government Publication
Works Cited Entry
United States. State Department. “Country Reports on Human Rights

Practices for 1993: Iraq.” Country Reports on Human Rights

Practices for 1993. Washington: GPO, 1994. 1184-1193. Web.

Click on the first line of the works cited entry for a detailed description of the format.

In-text citation for entry above
Summary
The United States State Department concluded that Iraq’s human rights did not reach accepted standards (“County” 1184-1186).

Back to List of Sources
Back to Top


The Source Home | Citing Sources | MLA | APA | Plagiarism | How to Format Essays | OCC Sources | Writing Links
OCC Home | English Department | Faculty/Staff Directory | Library