Online Sources

College Databases

Magazine (EBSCOHost)

First, determine if your source is a scholarly journal (published quarterly — it will say Fall, or Winter, and in most cases the pages will continue from issue to the next) or monthly/weekly magazine — both are formatted differently.

Magazine: Scholarly Journal

(published quarterly)

References Entry

Domhnall, M. (2001). The grammar of ornament: emily dickinson's

manuscripts and their meanings. Nineteenth-Century Literature, 55(4)

179-204. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

Author's last name, first initial. (Year published). Title of article

with first word in title caps. Title of Journal, Volume(Number):

Pages from beginning to end of article.

Retrieved from name of database.

In-text citation for entry above:
Direct quote:

Domhnal (2001) notes that “some critics allege that to read Dickinson in any standard typographic edition is effectively to read her in translation.” This suggests that the usual method of reading a poem in a textbook doesn't always reveal a writer's intention.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Magazine

(published monthly/weekly)

References Entry

Levinson, M. & Thomas, R. (1996, Jan. 15) One tax fits all. Newsweek 

Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

In-text citation for entry above:
Summary:

A flat tax rate sounds like a good idea, but as Levinson and Thomas (1996) argue, it would amount to higher taxes for the working class, and no taxes at all for the leisure class -- those people who live off money handed down to them.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Lexis-Nexis

References Entry

James, C. (1995, December 3). Dysfunction wears out its welcome. New

York Times, pp. H1, H23. Retrieved from Lexis-Nexis.

In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote
:

After analyzing sitcoms from the early 90s, James (1995) discovers that "they have come to resemble melodrama and soap opera more than they reflect comic versions of real life." James believes that sitcoms are supposed to reflect "real life" and thus are no longer relevant.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number. 

Proquest (New York Times)

References Entry

James, C. (1995, December 3). Dysfunction wears out its welcome. New York Times,

pp. H1, H23. Retrieved from Proquest.

In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote:

After analyzing sitcoms from the early 90s, James (1995) discovers that "they have come to resemble melodrama and soap opera more than they reflect comic versions of real life." James believes that sitcoms are supposed to reflect "real life" and thus are no longer relevant.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number. 

SIRS

References Entry

Elson, J. (1995, Nov. 12). The test that everyone fears. Time, 

Retrieved from SIRS Knowledge Source.

In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote (remember that you do not have to cite the entire sentence if it is not needed) and paraphrase:

Testing by University of Georgia psychologist Dr. Stuart Katz showed that university students "correctly answered [. . .] 38% of the multiple choice comprehension questions without even reading the test selections" (as cited in Elson, 1995). To answer a third of the questions through sheer luck illustrates the need to eliminate multiple choice evaluation.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Opposing Viewpoints

References Entry

Bennett, W. (2000). America faces a moral crisis. In Hurley, J. (Ed.)

Opposing Viewpoints: American Values. Retrieved from Opposing

Viewpoints Resources Center.

In-text citation for entry above: 
Partial direct quote:

The professed gambler Bennet (2000) – he of Book of Virtues infamy – illustrates this conservative hypocrisy. While he spends millions in gambling, he argues that it is not those of moral rectitude, like himself, that are despoiling his precious America, but others who suffer from “spiritual acedia.” But I have a question for Mr. Bennet: where in the bible does it say “Thou shalt lose millions at the green velvet tables of Las Vegas and Atlantic City”? He is a walking example of the difficulties of accusing others of leading an immoral life: and given his knowledge of the bible, he should know the danger of casting the first stone.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

EBSCOHost CINHAL with DOI number

References Entry: (Scholarly Journal)

Grossman, J., Donaldson, S., Belton, L., & Oliver, R. (2008).

5 A's smoking cessation with recovering women in treatment.

Journal of Addictions Nursing19(1): 1-8.

doi: 10.1080/10884600801896918

Description of above entry

Author's names. (Year). Title of article. Title of Journal,

Volume(Number): Pages from beginning to end of article.

DOI number, usually found on first page of document.

In-text citation for entry above: 
Partial direct quote

Research suggests that "18% of pregnant women continue to smoke" (Grossman, Donaldson, Belton& Oliver, 2003).

General Internet Sources

Internet Site

References Entry

Harlow, H. (n.d.). The nature of love. Retrieved from

 http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/harlow.htm.

NOTE: (n.d.) above stands for no date. If available, the date of article would go in the parenthesis.

In-text citation for entry above
Summary

At least one study suggests that tactical stimulation is just as important as food for nurture (Harlow, n.d.).

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Magazine/Newspaper Site

References Entry

Lopez, K. (2004 August 5, 2004). Not your father's labor union.

National Review  Online. Retrieved from

http://www.nationalreview.com/interrogatory/chavez 200408050802.asp

In-text citation for entry above:
Direct Quote

Linda Chavez, at the end of her union bashing screed, states "I know unions are corrupt" (Lopez, 2004).  What's missing in this essay on the influence of union money in political campaigns is any mention of corporate influence on the political process.  In the world that Lopez inhabits, big, bad unions are scourges out of touch with mainstream America.  But if it wasn't for labor unions, and the combined money they can bring to the political arena, would any politicians pay (no pun intended) attention to labor concerns — in other words, would they even listen to workers?  That's a question that Lopez and her fellow writers at The National Review are not prepared to answer — though they're more than ready to scare workers away from unions.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Course Site

References Entry

Bordelon, D. (2000). Introduction. Retrieved from

http://classroom.blackboard.net/courses/ENG257/index.html.

In-text citation for entry above:
Direct quote

The brilliant literary scholar Bordelon (2000) argues that literature is the stuff of life:

After all, literature in general . . . is about love lost or gained, the curious relationship between language and reality, a father shooting his son's murderer, a man learning to "see" with the help of a blind man; in short, it is about the flotsam and jetsam, vagaries and varieties of daily life. It seems only fair to hold reality up to fiction and see how it compares.

This view of literature means that instead of being boring words on a page, literature pulses with the blood of life: if you're splattered with red droplets, you know you've read properly.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

More