Online Sources

College Databases

Magazine (EBSCOHost)

First, determine if your source is a scholarly journal (published quarterly — it will say Fall, or Winter, and in most cases the pages will continue from issue to the next) or monthly/weekly magazine — both are formatted differently.

Magazine: Scholarly Journal

(published quarterly)

Works Cited Entry

Mitchell, Domhnall. "The Grammar of Ornament: Emily Dickinson's

Manuscripts and Their Meanings." Nineteenth-Century Literature 55.2

(2001): 179-204. Academic Search Premier. Web. 23 August 2001.

In-text citation for entry above:
Direct quote:

Domhnall Mitchell notes that "some critics allege that to read Dickinson in any standard typographic edition is effectively to read her in translation." This suggests that the usual method of reading a poem in a textbook doesn't always reveal a writer's intention.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Magazine

(published monthly/weekly)

Works Cited Entry

Levinson, Marc and Rich Thomas. "One Tax Fits All." Newsweek 15 January

1996: 36. Academic Search Premier. Web. 3 December 2000.

In-text citation for entry above:
Summary:

A flat tax rate sounds like a good idea, but as Marc Levinson and Rich Thomas argue, it would amount to higher taxes for the working class, and no taxes at all for the leisure class — those people who live off money handed down to them.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Lexis-Nexis

Works Cited Entry

James, Caryn. "Dysfunction Wears Out Its Welcome." New York Times

3 December 1995: H1+. Lexis Nexis. Web. 9 August 2004.

In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote:

After analyzing sitcoms from the early 90s, Caryn James discovers that "they have come to resemble melodrama and soap opera more than they reflect comic versions of real life." James believes that sitcoms are supposed to reflect "real life" and thus are no longer relevant.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Proquest (New York Times)

Works Cited Entry

James, Caryn. "Dysfunction Wears Out Its Welcome." New York Times

3 December 1995: H1+. Proquest. Web. 9 August 2004.

In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote:

After analyzing sitcoms from the early 90s, Caryn James discovers that "they have come to resemble melodrama and soap opera more than they reflect comic versions of real life." James believes that sitcoms are supposed to reflect "real life" and thus are no longer relevant.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

SIRS

Works Cited Entry

Elson, John. "The Test That Everyone Fears." Time 12 Nov. 1995:

93-94. SIRS. Web. 3 December 2000.

In-text citation for entry above:
Partial direct quote (remember that you do not have to cite the entire sentence if it is not needed) and paraphrase:

Testing by University of Georgia psychologist Dr. Stuart Katz showed that university students "correctly answered [. . .] 38% of the multiple choice comprehension questions without even reading the test selections" (qtd. in Elson). To answer a third of the questions through sheer luck illustrates the need to eliminate multiple choice evaluation.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Opposing Viewpoints

Bennet, William. "America Faces a Moral Crisis." Opposing Viewpoints:

American Values. Ed. Jennifer Hurley. 2000. Opposing Viewpoints

Resources Center. Web. 8 March 2004.

In-text citation for entry above: 
Partial direct quote

The professed gambler William Bennet – he of Book of Virtues infamy – illustrates this conservative hypocrisy. While he spends millions in gambling, Bennet argues that it is not those of moral rectitude, like himself, that are despoiling his precious America, but others who suffer from "spiritual acedia." But I have a question for Mr. Bennet: where in the bible does it say "Thou shalt lose millions at the green velvet tables of Las Vegas and Atlantic City"? He is a walking example of the difficulties of accusing others of leading an immoral life: and given his knowledge of the bible, he should know the danger of casting the first stone.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Gale Literature Resource

Works Cited Entry: (Scholarly Journal)

Kaplan, Steven. "The Undying Certainty of the Narrator in Tim O'Brien's

The Things they Carried." Critique 35.4 (1993): 43-52. Literature

Resource Center. Web. 10 August 2005.

In-text citation for entry above 
Partial direct quote

Another connection between the Vietnam War and current events is government lies. As Steven Kaplan notes "Before the United States became militarily involved in defending the sovereignty of South Vietnam, it had to, as one historian recently put it, "invent" [. . .] the political issues at stake there." Similarly, after weapons of mass destruction were not found in Iraq, our current administration had to "invent" a new rationale for attacking Iraq. And the rationale de jour, promoting democracy to protect American interests, is eerily similar to the failed objective in Southeast Asia.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

JSTOR

Works Cited Entry: (Scholarly Journal)

Goodman, Russell B. "East-West Philosophy in Nineteenth-Century America:

Emerson and Hinduism." Journal of the History of Ideas 51.4 (1993):

625-645. JSTOR. Web. 28 August 2009.

In-text citation for entry above 
Partial direct quote

While there are differences between Asian philosophies and Transcendentalism, Russell B. Goodman notes "that Emerson's philosophy, from his college days onward, grew up together with his knowledge of and interest in Hindu philosophical writing" (625 emphasis in original).

Note: Although this is an online source, page numbers are cited because they are included in the document itself.

Oxford English Dictionary (OED)

Works Cited Entry

"Redemption." Oxford English Dictionary Online. Oxford University Press.

n.d. Web. 28 August 2009.

In-text citation for entry above 
Partial direct quote

The religious connotations of Rowlandson's use of "redemption" are clear when the definition — "Deliverance from sin and its consequences by the atonement of Jesus Christ" — is understood ("Redemption")

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Oxford Reference Collection

Works Cited Entry

"Modernism." The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. Ed. Chris Baldick.

Oxford University Press, 2008. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford

University Press. Web. 6 March 2009.

In-text citation for entry above 
Partial direct quote

Modernism's attempt to shock and disorient readers is connected to their desire to reject "bourgeois values" ("Modernism").

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Facts on File

Works Cited Entry

Jaycox, Faith. "Settlement Spreads in New England, the Chesapeake,

and the Middle Atlantic: 1630–1642." The Colonial Era, An Eyewitness

History. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2002. American History

Online. Facts On File. Web. 28 August 2009.

In-text citation for entry above 
Partial direct quote

The combination of economics and religion in early Puritan literature is based on their involvement in the colonial enterprise. As the historian Faith Jaycox points out, "All investors were also colonists. In effect, the company, or corporation (as it was called), and the colony were one and the same."

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Article from CQ Researcher: MAGAZINE (PDF)

Works Cited Entry

Cooper, Mary H. "Income Inequality." CQ Researcher. The CQ Researcher Online. 

16 March 1997: 337-360. Web. 28 August 2009.  

In-text citation for entry above
Summarized source:

Work for a living? Feeling a bit poor lately? The link between the two is not difficult to explain when you examine recent pay raises. In 1997, the average worker received a raise of 3 percent. Her CEO? Many earned a 21 percent raise (Cooper 339). Feeling a bit angry now? 

Note: Although this is an online source, page numbers are cited because they are included in the PDF file.

Article from CQ Researcher: Online

Works Cited Entry

Cooper, Mary H. "Income Inequality." CQ Researcher. The CQ Researcher Online. 

16 March 1997. Web. 28 August 2009.  

In-text citation for entry above
Summarized source:

Work for a living? Feeling a bit poor lately? The link between the two is not difficult to explain when you examine recent pay raises. In 1997, the average worker received a raise of 3 percent. Her CEO? Many earned a 21 percent raise (Cooper). Feeling a bit angry now? 

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

General Internet Sources

Internet Site

Works Cited Entry

Harlow, Harry. "The Nature of Love." Classics in the History of Psychology.

York University. n.d. Web. 27 March 2004.

In-text citation for entry above
Summary

At least one study suggests that tactical stimulation is just as important as food for nurture (Harlow).

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Magazine/Newspaper Site

Works Cited Entry

Lopez, Kathryn Jean.  "Not Your Father's Labor Union." National Review

Online. National Review. 5 August 2004. Web. 8 August 2009.

In-text citation for entry above: 
Direct Quote

Kathyrn Jean Lopez, in an interview with Linda Chavez, at the end of her union bashing screed, states "I know unions are corrupt." What's missing in this essay on the influence of union money in political campaigns is any mention of corporate influence on the political process.  In the world that Lopez and Chavez inhabit, big, bad unions are scourges out of touch with mainstream America.  But if it wasn't for labor unions, and the combined money they can bring to the political arena, would any politicians pay (no pun intended) attention to labor concerns — in other words, would they even listen to workers?  That's a question that Lopez and her fellow writers at The National Review are not prepared to answer — though they're more than ready to scare workers away from unions.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Course Site

Works Cited Entry

Bordelon, David. "Introduction." Assignments. The Short Story. Ocean County

College. 2007. Web. 31 August 2009.

In-text citation for entry above:
Direct quote

The brilliant literary scholar David Bordelon argues that literature is the stuff of life:

After all, literature in general . . . is about love lost or gained, the curious relationship between language and reality, a father shooting his son's murderer, a man learning to "see" with the help of a blind man; in short, it is about the flotsam and jetsam, vagaries and varieties of daily life. It seems only fair to hold reality up to fiction and see how it compares. (The Short)

This view of literature means that instead of being boring words on a page, literature pulses with the blood of life: if you're splattered with red droplets, you know you've read properly.

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

Email

Works Cited Entry

Froriep, Kathleen."Re: Reading Comprehension Strategies." Message to

David Bordelon. 22 June 2005. Email.

In-text citation for entry above:
Summary

An important part of reading involves prereading, or quickly reviewing a text (Froriep).

Note: because this is an online source, no page numbers are cited. Author's name must be included. If no author, use initial words of title for in-text citation. If a PDF version of file is available, use that version and cite page number.

More