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The OCC Center for Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education

Ocean County College Center for Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education fosters student and community understanding of the causes and legacy of the Holocaust and other genocides such as the Armenian genocide, to create an acute awareness of contemporary human rights abuses locally, nationally, and globally through lectures, exhibits, and events. Please visit our website often to see what programs are forthcoming.

If you have any questions or suggestions for future programs and presenters, please contact:

Dr. Ali Botein-Furrevig, Professor/Director of the Center for Holocaust, Genocide and Human Rights Education
Location: W. Kable Russell Building (#7), Room 227
Phone: 732.255.0400, Ext. 2368
Email: abotein-furrevig@ocean.edu

Our Mission Statement

The core mission of the Ocean County College Center for Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education at Ocean County College is to serve the college and community by offering innovative educational programs and events which foster awareness of the Holocaust, genocides, and other crimes against humanity, and which advance ongoing dialogue about the pernicious consequences of bigotry, ethnic hatred, indifference, and intolerance. To this end, the Center will:

  • Regularly invite distinguished speakers to discuss topics regarding the Holocaust, genocides, and human rights.
  • Encourage student involvement in the work of the Center and in the pursuit of further study on issues pertinent to genocides and human rights, including an understanding of the various systemic stages of genocide and recognition of the signs and symptoms of prejudice and intolerance.
  • Introduce to the community, timely and frequent discussion of local, national, and global issues relevant to the mission of the Center.
  • Cultivate a campus climate that encourages reflection upon moral and ethical questions, so that students can become engaged and informed citizens committed to mutual respect and justice.
  • Maintain a program of outreach to local schools to engage students in the Center’s programs and to be a resource center for further study in holocaust and genocide studies, as well as cultural diversity.
  • Sponsor Yom haShoah, a week of Holocaust Remembrance events, including: personal testimonies and experiences of survivors; scholarly historical presentations; workshops; memorial prayer services; film, art, and music programs relative to the Holocaust.

Upcoming Events

April 25 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Grunin Center Theater

Singer, actress, recording artist, and educator Naomi Miller is the child of survivors. Born in a displaced person’s camp in Landsberg, Germany, she came to the United States when she was two years old with her parents, the sole survivors of their families.

Her program always evokes a wide range of emotions: Laughter, tears, hope, and understanding. And there is a charge to the new generation to “Never Forget.”

Tickets are not required for this event.

Tuesday, April 26 11:00-12:30 – Tech 115

THE NAZI MOSAIC: HITLER’S OTHER VICTIMS. In addition to the 6 million Jews killed, the Third Reich also murdered 5 million non-Jews including Polish citizens, homosexuals, Jehovahs’ Witnesses, Roma gypsies, dissenters, the mentally and physically disabled, and Afro-Europeans. Center Director Dr. Ali Botein-Furrevig will present an overview of the fate of these minorities under Nazi rule.

Tuesday, April 26 2:00-3:30 – Conference Room 109 A&B

NAZI ATROCITIES AGAINST SOVIET POWs On June 22, 1941, Nazi Germany invaded the Soviet Union, a turning point in the Second World War and the Holocaust. Dr. Justin Pfeifer, OCC History Lecturer will discuss the deliberate killing of over 3 million Soviet POWs during the Eastern Front War, the largest victim group of the Nazis second only to the Jews.

Wednesday, April 27 11:00- 12 :30 – Tech 115

THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE: HITLER’S WAR ON HOMOSEXUALITY: Following an introduction to the openly gay subculture in the Weimar Republic and the gay civil rights movement to decriminalize homosexuality, Center Director Dr. Ali Botein-Furrevig will discuss the fate of Germany’s gay population under Third Reich, when they were arrested and sent to prisons or concentration camps.

Thursday, April 28 9:30- 10:45 – TBA

THEIR LIVES DIDN’T MATTER: BLACKS UNDER THE SWASTIKA. Hitler referred to bi-racial children of African soldiers and German women as “Rhineland bastards,” a threat to the purity of the German race. They were persecuted, subjected to sterilization, and socially isolated. Black POWs from the US and Europe were also victims of the Third Reich. Presentation by Dr. Ali Botein-Furrevig.

Thursday, April 28 1:45 – 3:00 – Tech 115

HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE DAY. Commemoration of the 6 million Jewish victims and 5 million others who perished during the Holocaust. Dr. Ali Botein-Furrevig will offer introductory remarks, and a candle lighting and prayer service.

Friday, April 29 Roger Grunwald’s THE MITZVAH PROJECT 1:00 – 2:30 (postponed from earlier date)

Remote event. Combination play written by and starring Roger Grunwald and history lesson exploring the experience of the “Mischlings,” the Nazi’s derogatory term for those descended at least one Jewish grandparents, and who served in the German military. Q&A follows. go.ocean.edu/MitzvahProject

All events are free and open to the public.

Questions?

Contact Dr. Ali Botein-Furrevig 732-255-0400 ext. 2368 or abotein-furrevig@ocean.edu.

2022 OCC Holocaust Days of Remembrance: Monday, April 25—Friday, April 29

Honoring the Jewish Victims and Survivors

With Special Programs Remembering Hitler’s Other Victims

“The most deadly poison of our time is indifference” – Maximillian Kolbe

Maximillian Kolbe, venerated as Saint Maximillian Kolbe, a Polish Catholic priest and Conventual Franciscan friar who volunteered to die in place of a Jewish man in the German death camp of Auschwitz.

Be sure to visit:

Our flag exhibit on campus mall commemorating all 11 million victims of the Nazi Holocaust.

The Simon Wiesenthal Center’s traveling Holocaust exhibit, “The Courage to Remember” in our Center (2nd Floor Tower Room) and throughout the library. This exhibit has been displayed in the Vatican, on Capitol Hill, at the UN, and other parts of the US and the world.

We look forward to seeing you in April. Remembering the victims and honoring survivors is a noble and necessary act. As Elie Wiesel (1928-2016), Auschwitz survivor, author, humanist, and Nobel Laureate so eloquently states:

“If we forget, the dead , they will be killed a second time…and then they are today’s victims.”

All events are free and open to the public. Questions? Contact Dr. Botein-Furrevig: (732)255-0400 X2368; abotein-furrevig@ocean.edu

HUMAN RIGHTS EDUCATION

Our Mission Statement

The core mission of the Ocean County College Center for Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education at Ocean County College is to serve the college and community by offering innovative educational programs and events which foster awareness of the Holocaust, genocides, and other crimes against humanity, and which advance ongoing dialogue about the pernicious consequences of bigotry, ethnic hatred, indifference, and intolerance. To this end, the Center will:

  • Regularly invite distinguished speakers to discuss topics regarding the Holocaust, genocides, and human rights.
  • Encourage student involvement in the work of the Center and in the pursuit of further study on issues pertinent to genocides and human rights, including an understanding of the various systemic stages of genocide and recognition of the signs and symptoms of prejudice and intolerance.
  • Introduce to the community, timely and frequent discussion of local, national, and global issues relevant to the mission of the Center.
  • Cultivate a campus climate that encourages reflection upon moral and ethical questions, so that students can become engaged and informed citizens committed to mutual respect and justice.
  • Maintain a program of outreach to local schools to engage students in the Center’s programs and to be a resource center for further study in holocaust and genocide studies, as well as cultural diversity.
  • Sponsor Yom HaShoah, a week of Holocaust Remembrance events, including: personal testimonies and experiences of survivors; scholarly historical presentations; workshops; memorial prayer services; film, art, and music programs relative to the Holocaust.
Past Events
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Please contact:
Ali Botein Furrevig, Ph.D.
Professor/Director of the Center for Holocaust, Genocide and Human Rights Education

NOTABLE QUOTES

“I swore never to be silent whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation. We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.”

Elie Wiesel (1928-2016) Born in Transylvania. Holocaust survivor, Nobel Prize winning writer, teacher, activist speaking out against persecution and injustice around the globe.

“The highest result of education is tolerance.”

Helen Keller (1880-1968) American author and educator who was blind and deaf.

MORE ABOUT DR. ALI BOTEIN FURREVIG

Dr. Botein-Furrevig holds a BA, MA, and Ph.D. in English literature and is a recipient of a 2009 fellowship at the renowned YIVO Institute in NYC. She holds certificates in Jewish and Holocaust studies from American and Israeli universities. A retired tenured English professor at OCC, she developed courses in Hebrew, Jewish literature, and Holocaust literature. As Center Director, she teaches courses for the college community on Holocaust and Genocide studies, and Jewish culture and history. She also develops and delivers outreach programs for local schools on Judaism and antisemitism. Dr. Botein-Furrevig is the author of four books, two of which received distinguished awards: Heart of the Stranger: A Portrait of Lakewood’s Orthodox Community and Last Waltz on the Danube: The Ethnic German Genocide in History and Memory; The Stories We Carry: Texts and Contexts of Jewish History and Literature from the Biblical Era through the Diaspora; Beyond the Pale: Shtetl Roots, Emigrant Routes, and a New York City Love Story. Dr. Botein-Furrevig is a popular speaker throughout New York and New Jersey.

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